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  • gabdullah

    gabdullah

    March 10, 2015, 3:24 pm

    FWIW, here is what I wrote to the editor after reading this garbage:

    As the parent of a newborn, I am obviously concerned about the possibility of predators and sexual deviants luring my child as he navigates the dangerous waters of urban life.

    I am more concerned, however, that he will be forced to live in a city where pitchforks and torches are raised at the first whisper of an indecent act, and where those do the whispering not only attempt to justify their slander by invoking an ethical fallacy for the benefit of good copy ("Our law affords no protection from libel to the dead. So we will assume by his actions, and for the purpose of exploring this awful event, that Dewees was guilty as charged"), but make no effort to recant their slanderous and incorrect statements (which, in this case, seem to have influenced a man - who had not been shown guilty in front of our courts - to kill himself).

    Rosie DiManno's reckless column has influenced me to make a few decisions of my own: cancel my family subscription, and discourage my child from reading this sort of rubbish once he comes of age.

    Reply

  • apmihal

    apmihal

    March 10, 2015, 9:20 pm

    I'm sorry but that is not a good idea. That would definitely just be noise in the signal/noise ratio of her inbox. Instead it's better to ask her questions, that convey that you are morally confused about the content of her article, but are looking to her to clear it up. You will look slightly biased towards her opinion, and it will give you a chance to then turn her response against her.

    Honestly this is a really effective argument technique in general. If you can feign ignorance, and start to appear on their side, it just makes it all the more devastating when you give counter arguments that they can't sufficiently respond to, as long as you make it seem you are still on their side and that appear confident that they know the answer to your (loaded) question.

    Reply

  • VulturE

    VulturE

    March 10, 2015, 5:21 pm

    There are 3 power supplies out there (that I know of in existence) that all use the same overpriced, underpowered innards. I've owned 2 of them....one by choice, and another because I won it. They're fairly old-tech, and I recommend pretty much anything else. The reviews were always mediocre too. I RMAd my Thermaltake 680W 3 or 4 times before I got a nice one.

    I always aim to spend ~$100 or less on a good quality PSU that has everything I need. Modular, 4 or more 12v rails, 1 120mm fan, good reviews on newegg and review sites, and preferably 80%+ efficient when I need that. Of course, sometimes you can find great PSUs on discount for 50-60$, but picking a quality PSU is necessary...so spend money if need be. It could fuck your whole day otherwise.

    Reply

  • plecostomus

    plecostomus

    March 10, 2015, 3:37 pm

    1. Part of me feels like I don't want kids as part of a rebellious streak-- I've been told (as a woman) it's my duty to squirt out a couple and give up my life to care for them since well before I was a teenager, and I've always responded with a firm "no." I always thought it was incredibly patronizing of people (sometimes when I've only just met them!) to tell me what I can and can't do with my life.

    2. But on the other hand, I genuinely don't like being around children. I especially don't like babies. Even a baby's cry on a TV commercial annoys the hell out of me-- so that part I would say is just a tic of mine.

    3. I can help a lot more people and I can do more for the world by continuing in my current studies than I can by birthing my very own resource-sucker. I love to travel, I love the feeling of freedom, and I will not give that up even for the "special joy" of a kid.

    4. This isn't a reason as much as it is an influence I feel pressed to acknowledge. People in my family have always married for life. My parents have been married 25 years, my grandparents on both sides had been married 50-60 years before one or both spouses died. However, my friends at school were almost universally raised by single moms and it sucked for both them and their mothers. An older woman I worked with at my first job had an ex-husband who had never paid child support (they have 5 kids) and she cannot afford legal costs for hunting him down. She is the hardest-working person I have ever met, and it's still not enough. Another one of my friends was beaten by her boyfriend when she told him she was pregnant.

    Suffice to say, I'm probably scared of falling prey to a deadbeat dad.

    Reply

  • jonuggs

    jonuggs

    March 11, 2015, 8:56 am

    I have a lot of personal stories that are certainly open for interpretation, but the one that always got to me was a story from a friend.

    I had a lot of friends go to Virginia Tech. I've been to Blacksburg a few times and, from what I grasp, BBurg is basically at the foot of a small mountain. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    There is a small town near the top of the mountain, and then some factories, etc. on the other side. In order to get to the factories and whatever else may be over there, you have to take one, two-lane road up and down the mountain. There is one stop light in the town.

    So my buddy's brother works at a factory on the other side of the mountain. He works an early shift, and has to get up around 3a.m. in order to get to work at 430a.m. So he does his morning thing and then starts his way up the mountain. It's dark outside as he comes to the traffic light in the middle of the town. He slows down and stops because the light is red and sits there twiddling his thumbs. At this intersection there are only a few buildings - a convenience store to his immediate right, and a post office that is catty-corner (sp?) to the general store.

    He sits there for two, three, five minutes, and realizes that the light isn't changing for some reason. He decides to wait a bit longer when, out of the corner of his right eye he sees a man dressed in black, wearing a wide-brimmed black hat, leaning up against the general store, in shadow, just out of the reach of a light.

    When my buddy's brother looks over, the guy starts coming toward the car. The light still hasn't changed when this guy approaches the passenger window and lightly knocks on it. My buddy's brother unrolls the window a bit, thinking that the guy might need some help. The man in the hat is very cordial and says, "I'm very sorry to trouble you, but I was coming up the mountain, returning home, when my car broke down a few miles back. I could really use a ride to the other side of the mountain."

    My buddy's brother didn't remember seeing a car broken down anywhere and promptly replied with something akin to: "I'm sorry, man, but I'm running late for work."

    The man in the hat is somewhat terse, but still nice: "I really, really need a ride, sir." But he was denied again. At that point, the man in the hat grabs the window and pulls on it and begins shouting: "LET ME IN! I NEED TO GET TO THE OTHER SIDE!"

    So my buddy's bro decides to run the light, slams on the gas, and as he's peeling away he hears the man scream: "DON'T YOU KNOW WHO I AM?"

    He's really gunning it down the other side of the mountain. His adrenaline is pounding, and he's put several miles between him and the town. He decides that he needs to pull it together - he doesn't want to get into an accident because he's so spooked. So he pulls over to the shoulder and takes a deep breath. He looks to his left, out the driver-side window and. . .

    . . .the guy in the hat is standing right next to the car.

    My buddy's brother blacked out. He woke up in the parking lot of the factory that he worked at, curled up on the floorboards by gas pedals, with a strange white light shining into his car from the sky. He wasn't even late for work.

    I get goosebumps just thinking about this story. To this day he doesn't like to talk about it, and hates it if you approach him about it.

    Reply

  • jawookie

    jawookie

    March 10, 2015, 11:34 pm

    What films really stand out to you as having great cinematography? Any specific shots in particular? Not necessarily having huge shots, but where the picture really tells the story and emotions. That's the one aspect of film that has always interested me.

    I can name the first time I really truly noticed the cinematography. In "Road to Perdition" when Michael Sullivan walks into an apartment and it's framed so you can see him standing at the front door and you can see through the open door into a bedroom where his son is sitting on a bed. They're practically next to each other, but are so far away because of this wall between them. After that I have always loved paying attention to the cinematography when watching a film.

    Reply

  • DankJemo

    DankJemo

    March 10, 2015, 6:57 am

    It was a bit of a let down for me. i didn't bother with the multiplayer and i played through the single player campaign. It was really quite entertaining at first, and then it just got repetitive. Not to mention all the little annoying bugs that would crop up throughout the game. The graphics were a bit dated, to say the least however that isn't a huge problem for me.

    I just had high hopes for this game since it was a Wolfenstein game, and they typically are pretty good. I thought there were some good mechanics, but they didn't really come together well, either... and your power gauge died so fast a lot of the extra abilities were nothing more then fluff, but the game required you to rely on them like they weren't.

    Reply

  • brownb2

    brownb2

    March 10, 2015, 8:18 am

    Good Sir, your suggestion of Wales is most welcome and I shall be affording myself the luxury of a visit to the south of it. I did spend too long in towns in the other regions aforementioned; St Austell and Mevagissey (whose people are a lively band of yokels but with whom one can feel relaxed), Ambleside, Bowness and Milnthorpe, and Middlesbrough, who are doubly blessed with the tranquillity of the nearby Dales and the beauty of the Transporter Bridge. Unfortunate that it is in recent years the area has witnessed decline, nonetheless the "canny" Geordies are veritably lively. Good day to you sir.

    Reply

  • therandomizer

    therandomizer

    March 11, 2015, 4:30 am

    Sounds like someone has already made up their mind whether this guy was guilty or not. All the more reason to tell the telemarketer that I don't want a fucking subscription to the Star. The Toronto Sun is bad, but I've never heard of them doing something like this. The lawyers at the Toronto Star better be ready to settle with Dewees's family, cause if they don't see how they may have contributed to the death of this man then they are completely out of touch with reality. DiManno sees a man wrought with guilt because he knew what he had done was wrong, but he just as easily could've been an innocent man who would have to go through life with this stigma, accused of being a pedophile which would drastically alter almost all aspects of his life.

    Reply

  • amarks563

    amarks563

    March 10, 2015, 7:09 am

    I disagree. The problem with politics is that chaff in media like Limbaugh and Beck obscures any real information about serious issues. If we actually had nutcases on both sides, the resulting flamewar would take a lot of exposure away from the real political theater, and prevent more Americans from actually being informed.

    Besides, most moderates recognize their idiocy (whether the media knows it or not), so having a one-sided fool's gallery helps push the public a little further left, at least into the territory of the reasonable.

    Reply

  • fishy007

    fishy007

    March 10, 2015, 10:59 am

    It's actually guaranteed he'd lose his job. I'm not sure if you're American or Canadian, but a few things have happened like this over the past few years in Ontario and the people have all followed the same pattern:

    1) Suspended pending the outcome of the investigation.

    2) Found guilty and dismissed from job

    OR

    2) Found not-guilty but had to quit anyway due to the uproar in the community and lack of trust from parents.

    That stigma would follow him for many years even if he was found not-guilty.

    Reply

  • miked4o7

    miked4o7

    March 11, 2015, 7:03 am

    You're not comparing apples to apples here at all. The health insurance industry as it exists today was absolutely nothing like it was in the first half of the 20th century. Most things were on a pay-per-service basis, but not through insurance at all... just direct out-of-pocket costs.

    Also, doctors and hospitals would for the most part gladly accept a pay basis that effectively pays them on quality rather than quantity... how in the world does that create a competitive disadvantage? The only people who will be dead-set against an equitable pay-per-outcome system will be the Betsy McCaughey's of the world... people who profit from medical supply sales and Rx sales.

    Reply

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